Monthly Archives: July 2013

Innovators Youth Win the 2013 HP Social Innovation Relay

Junior Achievement recently announced the winner of the 3rd Annual Social Innovation Relay, a global competition organized in collaboration with HP that challenges secondary school learners to develop an innovative business concept that addresses a social need. Innovators Youth from India won the competition. Under the guidance and support of an HP e-mentor from Singapore, the team developed a revolutionary building material, made out of rice husk boards. The team will buy rice husk from farmers and create a building material, which they called “Green Wood”.

The winners will be joining the JA-YE Europe 10th Alumni Conference in Tallinn, Estonia in August 2013.

Access to technology is crucial to enable learners to be successful in the labor market of the 21st century. Globally, a large number of learners do not have this access which puts them at risk for unemployment even before they have entered the labor market. The Social Innovation Relay seeks to close this gap by bringing innovative technology and hands-on educational programs to schools, equipping learners with technological and entrepreneurial skills to succeed in school and beyond.

The Social Innovation Relay provides young people with the hands-on skills and entrepreneurial expertise needed to start a successful career through a combination of virtual and face-to-face mentoring by experienced executives. The participating teams are paired with mentors who are all HP employees and who connect with the finalists to help them develop concept papers that can translate in feasible business ideas.

“The quality and increasing number of innovative, socially orientated business ideas reflects a successful collaboration with HP mentors and our partner Junior Achievement. The Social Innovation Relay is part of HP’s commitment to apply our expertise and technology to enable learners to develop IT and business skills and solve societal issues, leading to a future with many more bright social minded entrepreneurs. ”  Jeannette Weisschuh, director, Global Education Programs, Sustainability and Social Innovation, HP

The Social Innovation Relay was first launched in 2010, and over the past three years more than 67,000 students and 800 HP mentors from 19 countries have participated, submitting their socially innovative concepts. This year, nearly 1,600 teams around the world registered for the relay showcasing an ever increasing interest in the initiative around the world.

In South Africa more than 750 learners participated in this year’s relay, with 75 teams registering their ideas on the Social Innovation Relay website.

The team ANTS representing Eqinisweni Secondary School in Thembisa, won the national competition with their innovative Joy Swing concept – a playground that generates kinetic energy to power houses in non-electrified areas. The team continued to develop their idea, and competed against 18 other national winning teams in July in the global online final.

The ANTS worked hard to develop a video and refine their Powerpoint presentation in less than a week and Junior Achievement is extremely proud of how hard the team worked together.

 

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Young Entrepreneurs Show Promise

The Youth Enterprise Development (YED) Programme, funded by the DG Murray Trust, and the ITS TYME Programme, funded by Absa, were launched by Junior Achievement South Africa last year, to try to alleviate the high rate of youth unemployment in South Africa.   Both programmes focus on  teaching unemployed youth between the ages of 18 and 35 how to start and run their own sustainable businesses. 

Since the start of the YED Programme midway through 2012, JASA has carefully monitored and mentored the small business owners that have completed the programme. During the mentorship phase, JASA has seen some astounding outcomes of the programme, through the successful, sustainable businesses that have flourished in the past six months. We have decided to feature two of the many successful businesses that have resulted from the out of school programmes. 

Nolubabalo Madudela, 33

Nolubabalo was already a business owner when she began the Youth Enterprise Development Programme, funded by the DG Murray Trust, at the NYDA office in Cape Town in August 2012.  She started selling fish and chips from her house in 2007 when she couldn’t find a job, but joined the programme because she wanted to learn how to grow her business into a sustainable, functional enterprise. 

During the programme she realised that she needed to  include additional products to ensure that she had enough of a selection to grow her target market and decided to add fat cakes to her menu, which increased the demand for her products.  Nolubabalo had one stall when she started the programme, but the demand for her products has grown so much in the past six months, that she has added a second stall at a busy location.  Nolubabalo’s business NS Mini Tuckshop also employs three people; two to assist with the preparation of the food and an additional lady to run the new stall.  Nolubabalo notes that she has experienced some challenges but that her ability to adapt and learn has helped her create a successful, sustainable business.

Sarah Dube, 33

Sarah Dube started her small health food business, called Go Vegan, during the Youth Enterprise Development Programme, funded by the DG Murray Trust, at the NYDA office in Cape Town in August 2012. She had previously tried her hand at selling whole-wheat fat cakes but did not have the know how to further develop her business.  During the programme, Go Vegan began by selling pies and samoosas, on foot, in areas with heavy foot traffic. 

Sarah’s business has grown dramatically in the past six months and she has added a variety of muffins, cakes, sesame bars and health cakes to her menu.  Go Vegan not only has a strong individual customer base but Sarah is now supplying a bed and breakfast establishment, a hair salon and three colleges with baked goods. Sarah is pleased with her progress thus far and she has big dreams for Go Vegan.  Sarah currently has no transport and she has to carry her stock as she delivers to her customers.  Her next goal is to open her own shop and employ someone to help her bake and prepare her orders for the next day.

 

Two JASA Alumni Feature in Mail & Guardian’s 200 Young South Africans

Junior Achievement South Africa is proud to announce that TWO of our successful alumni have been included in this years Mail & Guardian 200 Young South Africans edition.
This is the eighth year that Mail & Guardian have searched for 200 young, inspiring South Africans to feature. “Half-a-dozen researchers independently scour the country for three months searching for interesting young people doing amazing things. We also take our readers’ nominations—more than 1 200 came through this year—and sift through them for the best of the bunch. Our editorial staff and our most reliable sources send in their recommendations. Then we whittle down our long list into a short list and ultimately into a final list of young people who then are profiled by a team of writers and presented across our platforms. Each year we find 200 young people, aged 35 and under, who were born here or have made South Africa their home, and who are full of talent, dreams and drive,” noted Tanya Pampalone, Executive Editor, 200 Young South Africans.

You may have seen Ntuthuko’s story in various publications last year. He was selected as one of our Faces of JASA 2012. Ntuthuko completed his JASA programme in 1997 and the programme sparked his interest in entrepreneurship, which eventually lead to him starting his own panel beating shop. Ntuthuko is still a loyal follower of JASA and he is always first in line to give back to the organisation by offering to share his story and provide field trips to his workshop to learners and learners currently on JASA programmes.

Happy Khambule is also a strong supporter of Junior Achievement South Africa. After completing the Mini Enterprise Programme in 2006, Happy went on to complete the Banks in Action and Success Skills programmes in 2007 and JA Titan in 2008. Happy went on to be elected as Financial Manager of the JASA Youth Council in 2008. Since then, Happy has always been willing to assist JASA with mentoring and events. Most recently Happy gave up five days from his busy schedule to mentor a group of five learners during the Investec Junior Innovators Competition. Happy is another one of Junior Achievement South Africa’s most promising alumni.

Ntuthuko SheziNtuthuko Shezi
If you need to catch a flight from OR Tambo airport and your car has a dent, or a cracked windscreen, Scratch Mobile will fix it for you while you are away. Scratch Mobile is the brainchild of 32-year-old Ntuthuko Shezi, whose passion for business stemmed from a desire to change his family’s financial situation. He grew up in rural Ndwedwe in KwaZulu-Natal, with a single mother, a teacher who sold sweets, fish and vetkoek for extra money at the school she worked at, and Shezi would often help her. His grandparents kept cows for milk and grew their own fruit and vegetables. The family had no electricity. These difficulties have led to Shezi’s dream of being a future Ndwedwe ward councillor. When he left his job in management consulting he fortuitously recognised a gap in the panel-beating industry. Even through he did not have a clue about panel beating, his degree in engineering from the University of Cape Town made it easier for him to demystify in his head a subject many see as rocket science. His history in management alerted him to the fact that the industry was known for offering little compassion and care to customers and he wanted to change this and give customers who needed their cars fixed an option that was convenient for them and put their needs first. Scratch Mobile, which does panel beating, spray painting and auto glass repairs and replacements, is the first known business of its kind in the world and Shezi is looking to expand, as its success has been exceptional. The business fixes between 170 and 200 cars every month and has a turnover of a few million a year. His aim is to be a game-changer, not just to do things the way they have been done for a long time. — Ilham Rawoot

Happy Khambule

Happy Khambule
Happy Khambule loves being part of a collective. It’s his “we” attitude that makes him a British Council Global Changemaker and International Climate Champion. Khambule, a climate-change activist with a law degree, dreamt in early childhood of being president. Now he not only aspires to shape South Africa’s environmental policies but also to effect real change within communities, working with schools and the youth to create awareness of climate change. Although he has big ambitions he doesn’t allow them to overshadow his passions. The work he does as Gauteng co-ordinator of Project 90 x 2030 allows him to strike the right balance between the two. The project challenges society to change the way it lives in order to preserve the environment. The aim is to reduce our carbon footprint by 90% by the year 2030. Khambule’s philosophy is that “every generation equips the next generation with knowledge”. It is his job to get schools in the province to change their attitude towards the environment by setting up green clubs and educating pupils about sustainable behaviours. In light of his involvement with Ashoka Youth Ventures, a global project that gets young people thinking about how to address social issues, it is only natural that the work he does focuses so strongly on change. But getting people to change has its own challenges. To keep the youth interested and involved in climate change Khambule and his team continually have to think of more innovative and exciting campaigns using social media and whatever other tools are available. His mom has always told him to enjoy whatever it is that he does. Khambule takes that advice further. He loves what he does — working with people and making change happen. “When you see change happen and it has come about from a collective effort that is perfect.” — Caroline Cowan

http://ysa2013.mg.co.za/