Tag Archives: HSBC

HSBC Funds JA South Africa for a Seventh Consecutive Year to Inspire and Educate Youth in Schools

HSBC has, for the seventh consecutive year partnered with Junior Achievement South Africa to support the in-school facilitation of the More Than Money programme in primary schools. In addition to the financial HSBC T-Shirtpartnership, HSBC employee volunteers are trained at the commencement of the programme to facilitate a guide learners through the  More Than Money community and business game. The volunteers, armed with an understanding of the principles of the board game visit schools with the likes of; Sandtonview School, Abdullah Bin Salaam Islamic School, Bonwelong Primary and Dr Knak Primary School where they facilitate classroom sessions with grade 5-7 learners using the board game to teach principles of earning, spending, sharing, and saving money.

The programme emphasises social studies content while providing a strong focus on mathematics, reading, and writing skills. The More than Money experience enhances learners’ classroom curriculum. Learners are encouraged to use innovative thinking to learn money-management skills that support positive attitudes towards money.

HSBC Volunteer

HSBC MTM

Through a variety of hands-on activities, learners develop a better understanding of the relationship between what they learn at school and their successful participation in a worldwide economy.

Annually an independent assessment of the programme is conducted. In South Africa, learners understanding of money management is improved substantially. Also, they are now deem entrepreneurship as a viable career path and are seen to be more committed to school.

 

 

Environmental Entrepreneurs Survey Results

Junior Achievement South Africa recently completed a survey relating to their Environmental Entrepreneurs Programme, funded by HSBC.

45 of the 50 participating Gauteng schools completed the survey and the results were phenomenal.

The Environmental Entrepreneurs Programme was overwhelmingly successful and the school educators and learners welcomed and greatly enjoyed it. The programme is aligned to the school curriculum which ensured support and engagement of the educators.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENTREPRENEURS 2012/2013

GAUTENG

 Total schools in 2012 and 2013: 50

Total schools surveyed: 45

Summary of results:

The Environmental Entrepreneurs Programme was overwhelmingly successful and the school educators and learners welcomed and greatly enjoyed it. The programme is aligned to the school curriculum which ensured support and engagement of the educators.

The results of the survey indicate that there has been a definite increase among the educators and learners in awareness of the need to keep the environment clean, save energy and not pollute. Results also indicate that learners have changed their behaviour and taken action to ensure that they do keep their environment clean.

When asked if the programme had an effect on how the educators approach environmental issues in their teaching, all but 2 of the schools surveyed reported that the teachers’ insight, approach and personal awareness of environmental issues increased.  In addition, all the schools indicated that the programme had an impact on the environment around the school with some schools starting to clean their own school grounds and other schools cleaning the environment around the school.

The principals and educators also reported that the learners’ behaviour had changed as a result of their participation in the programme.  Schools that are involved with recycling projects saw learners become much more active and participating more, taking responsibility in sorting recycling material at school. Most schools indicated that the learners started keeping their environment cleaner and making use of bins provided.

Specifically, the principal at Mveledzo Primary School in Mamelodi reported that “Educators encourage learners now to pick up the papers and litter and keep the school grounds clean. The learners eagerly participate as they enjoyed the programme so much.” This statement was made in August 2013 and the programme was implemented at Mveledzo in May 2012. The principal at Sikanyisele Primary School said, “This programme solved most of our littering problems as learners are willing to pick up the litter on the school grounds”.  Ithute Primary School reported “Our school is now free of litter… they put rubbish in the bin provided.”

Schools that started their own recycling programmes reported that the Environmental Entrepreneurs Programme was the impetus for doing that. Some schools began collecting plastic bottles, cans and papers for recycling. Moretele Primary School entered a competition with ABI and received mobile bins from the Department of Environmental Affairs. Malvern Primary School started collect-a-can and Ithute Primary School began collecting recycling materials for selling.

All schools involved highly recommend the continuation of the programme in their schools. There were many requests for the programme to continue. Some schools preferred that the grade 7’s attend the programme, while most requested for learners to receive the programme in grade 6 and 7 to enforce the learning. Many schools indicated the benefit of the programme to the educators and requested more involvement of the educators in terms of presenting workshops to them as well.

Not only were the learners learning about environmental issues but other skills were developed through our methodology. The learners improved their communication skills which increased their self-esteem and self-confidence. Creativity was encouraged through the practical activities and the learners greatly improved their ability to express themselves. Social skills were developed as the learners had to work together in groups to share ideas, make plans, delegate tasks, share materials and deliver products.

The facilitators on the programme also witnessed bonding between educators and learners. Many educators reported that the programme was very insightful, not only for the content, but also for learning different methods of teaching and seeing how group work can be effective as a teaching methodology.

There is no question that the Environmental Entrepreneurs Programme was very well received and had much impact on many levels with the learners and the educators.

The complete evaluation report with answers to specific survey questions is available upon request.

Other Notable Quotes:

Legora Primary School, Principal Mohlamme Mathebe:  “The children no longer get into the flower gardens (damaging the plants) and they do not litter as they used to. I also noticed that the taps are not dripping. It would be great if this programme could be filmed so that all the children could see the demonstrations”.

Mahlasedi Primary School, Principal Joe Suman: “The programme enhanced the school curriculum as it was incorporated in arts and culture, natural science as well as social science”.

Meetse A Bophelo Primary School, Principal Patrick Sikhumbana and HOD Maphutu Rammutla: “Let JASA bring more programmes … We really love the programme, they must come back again. It was excellent”.

Mononong Primary School, Principal Mrs Mbehlele and HOD Mr Koka: “Our experience with JASA and the facilitators was excellent because of the impact it has on the behaviour and responsibility taken for the environment.”

Morakoma Primary School, Principal MT Letepe and HOD D Legodi: “I recommend that JASA start with our school beginning next year so that the learners can use that knowledge throughout the year.”

Tshimollo Primary School, Principal JT LEshika and HOD Maria Ramushu: “The programme was informative and opened our eyes that waste products can be re-used”.

Chief Lithuli Primary School, HOD Sandra Taby and Educator Thandi Ntuli: “The programme was helpful in changing behaviour towards the environment at school and at homes”.

Kgalema Primary School, Deputy Principal Anna Mokone: “All schools must participate so that we have one voice on keeping our environment clean and protected.  The Eco-warrior programme is a very vital program that should continuously assist and advice school on matters relating to the environment.”

Ditau Primary School Principal Rosta Masudubele and HOD Mr Gregory Kokong: “….well monitored programme, so well organised… continuation of this programme would not only benefit learners but also the stakeholders of the school at large.”

Selpe Thema Primary School: “It was one of the most interesting and enjoyable programmes the learners ever had.”

Usindiso Primary School: “There are environmental issues that we tend to ignore; this programme made us aware of them. Please include grade 5’s as it will lay a good foundation for their natural and social science subjects and skills.”

Vukanzenzele Primary School, HOD Angel Mbanjwa and Co-facilitator Bongani Nkosi: “This is an edu-taining programme – educating and entertaining! We recommend this campaign to all learners in all school.”

Eco Programme KZNParkhurst 7

MONEY MATTERS: Teach them young and avoid hard lessons later

*This article was first published in Sunday Times: Money & Careers

Apr 7, 2013 | Warren Ingram

Your offspring would do well to fear credit cards and personal loans
Entrepreneurship-Academy-Ic
CHILDREN who grow up understanding money will have a real advantage in life – and the sooner parents start teaching their offspring about this vital part of modern living the better. Our values in terms of money are formed at an early age, so it is important for the lessons of good money habits to start from the moment children can speak. It will be almost impossible for them to change these habits when they are parents themselves. These are the principal points you need to drum home:

What you need vs what you want

We need to help children understand that their financial resources will always be limited. Often, parents try to give their children everything they want, especially sought-after items such as smartphones.

Use your children’s demands for these items as an opportunity for a money lesson. If they want a smartphone, help them to work out how to earn and save enough money to get one, rather than simply buying one for them. This should include doing extra chores at home to earn additional money, which establishes the principle that extra work leads to more money.

You could also help them to open a savings account in which their money can earn interest until they have sufficient funds to buy the phone they want.

You might even teach children how to start a small business to earn money to buy the things they want. The lessons involved in this sort of project are numerous – marketing, negotiating prices, scheduling workloads and determining what resources are required.

Budgeting basics

Don’t shield children from the real cost of food, clothing and luxuries, because they will need to understand these costs when they live on their own. You could start to involve them in your budgeting decisions by, for example, telling them what the family spends every month and how this relates to the family income.

Teaching your children how to budget is nearly as important as teaching them to read. It should be second nature by the time they leave school.

But try to impart knowledge about money without burdening your children with guilt.

When times are tough, use the situation as an opportunity to explain how the family will adapt and, more importantly, how to develop a plan to work yourselves out of your situation.

Investing for the future

By the time your child is in high school, you should be discussing how their savings should be invested. Few young adults know anything about investing. They might have heard of concepts such as unit trusts and shares, but they have limited understanding of what these are.

Take the time to explain these concepts to your children and start investing some of their money in a unit trust or exchange-traded fund, such as Satrix, to teach them real-life lessons about investing.

Teach them to fear debt

One of the most important lessons about money will be how they manage – and preferably avoid – debt. Try to raise children who have a fear of credit cards and loans.

The one factor that most often leads to financial success is the ability to save and avoid debt. Few people manage to do this, which is why so few people are able to retire comfortably.

Consistent discipline

Your children need to learn that financial success is achieved by consistently spending less than they earn. Achieving a balance between instant gratification and long-term discipline is critical. If your children have this discipline by the time they leave home, you will have given them a head start in life.

Warren Ingram is a certified financial planner and wealth manager who has been advising people about their investments since 1996. He is a director of Galileo Capital

HSBC Staff Volunteer at Sandtonview Combined School

8 very busy HSBC staff volunteered some of their time to assist 80 Grade 5 and 6 learners from Sandtonview Combined School.  The learners are participating in a Junior Achievement Programme sponsored by HSBC known as the JA More than Money (MTM) Programme.  The JA MTM programme is a six to eight week programme that teaches primary school learners fundamental financial literacy specifically focusing on budgeting, saving and banking.  The HSBC staff volunteered during week 4 of the programme which involved facilitating the learners playing a board game, designed by HSBC to teach the learners about the benefits of saving and investing money.  This is the 3rd year that Junior Achievement South Africa (JASA) and HSBC have run the JA MTM programme at the school and each year the number of learners attending the programme increases dramtically.

Fadeela Laher, Programme Co-Ordinator for Junior Achievement South Africa (JASA) noted that the learners always benefit from visits from volunteers as it allows them to interact with people they wouldn’t usually interact with.  The learners all enjoyed the visit and learnt a lot from the volunteers, who were up for the challenge and fielded a wide variety of questions from their groups of learners.

HSBC Staff visit an Environmental Entrepreneurs Programme

Several staff members from HSBC attended a session of Junior Achievement South Africa’s Environmental Entrepreneurs programme at MC Weiler Primary School in Eastbank, Johannesburg.

Funded by HSBC Global, the Environmental Entrepreneurs programme has been developed for implementation in schools for learners in Grades 6 and 7 – ages 10 – 12 years. The programme was initially piloted in Latin America and has been redesigned to suit the environmental needs of South Africa.  The launch in Africa has been made possible by a further generous grant from HSBC Global of £1,200 000 – £600 000 for South Africa and £300 000 each for Nigeria and Kenya.  Isabel Correia, Head of Marketing and Company Secretary for HSBC South Africa noted “If we are successful in promoting environmental awareness and care amongst the young people who are our future leaders, we have a far greater chance of mitigating challenges to the environment and achieving higher levels of environmental sustainability.”

The learners learnt about the three “R”’s – Reduce, Reuse and Recycle and were divided into teams, that had to develop, plan and launch their own sustainable recycling businesses.  The HSBC volunteers assisted these teams in putting together their team mascots, using recycled material.

Fadeela Laher, Programme Co-Ordinator for Junior Achievement South Africa (JASA), noted that the learners had been eager to meet with the HSBC volunteers and that she believed that the learners had benefitted immensely from both the programme and the HSBC visit.

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Junior Achievement South Africa & HSBC Address Youth Unemployment and Climate Change

Junior Achievement South Africa announced on Monday the launch of its Environmental Entrepreneurs programme. The programme focuses on promoting an understanding of the challenges of climate change, and how changes in behaviour can mitigate these challenges. It aims to encourage responsibility and cooperation among the learners, as these characteristics are necessary to drive personal habits which can ensure environmental sustainability. The programme culminates in the launch of a recycling project, initiated by the learners, encouraging socially responsible businesses.

Eco Programme 2012

Funded by HSBC Global, the Environmental Entrepreneurs programme has been developed for implementation in schools for learners in Grades 6 and 7 – ages 10 – 12 years. The programme was initially piloted in Latin America and has been redesigned to suit the environmental needs of South Africa.  The launch in Africa has been made possible by a further generous grant from HSBC Global of £1,200 000 – £600 000 for South Africa and £300 000 each for Nigeria and Kenya.  Isabel Correia, Head of Marketing and Company Secretary for HSBC South Africa noted “If we are successful in promoting environmental awareness and care amongst the young people who are our future leaders, we have a far greater chance of mitigating challenges to the environment and achieving higher levels of environmental sustainability.”

During the seven week programme, learners will be taught about climate change and the effect it has on the world and its economies. They will also be introduced to the concept of sustainable development and how it relates to care and conservation of our natural resources.  They will learn about the three “R”’s – Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. Finally the learners will be divided into teams, which will be required to develop, plan and launch their own sustainable recycling businesses.

Eco Programme 2012

“South Africa is perfectly positioned to be at the forefront of environmentally and socially responsible business in the world.  With our high rate of unemployed youth and high levels of pollution, Junior Achievement South Africa and HSBC Global identified an opportunity for us to translate the issues of our country into a key development focus. The Environmental Entrepreneurs programme will help create environmentally conscious, social entrepreneurs from a very young age, while addressing youth unemployment and global warming,” stated Linda McClure, Managing Director of Junior Achievement South Africa.

“All eyes will be on South Africa during the COP17 conference next week, when representatives of the world’s governments, international organizations and civil society will meet in Durban to discuss the global effects of climate change.  This programme aims at diminishing the causes of climate change as well as diminishing poverty and unemployment in South Africa through promoting entrepreneurship as an alternative option to employment,”she added.