Tag Archives: Youth Enterprise Development Programme

JA South Africa’s Largest Certification Ceremony Yet, Takes Place in Mamelodi, Pretoria

one of the graduates at the Mamelodi Out Of School Programme hires graduation attire for her own account - she is that proud!

A proud graduate of the JA South Africa ITS TYME Programme

Friday, 5 May 2015 saw the graduation of an impressive 100 young people from the JA South Africa Out of School ITS TYME. The programme, funded by Barclays, is a 20-session incubator style programme for out of school unemployed youth between the ages of 18 – 35 and is facilitated over three months. What is unique about the JA South Africa programme is the fact that students are required to start up and run a sustainable business during the programme. The programme includes site visits, case studies, guest speakers, and an introduction to micro finance as well as mentorship and support for a period after completion of the formally structured programme.

In Mamelodi, the programme was offered at Entokozweni Youth Development Centre and Stanza Bopape Skills Centre. Mamelodi, has an unofficial population of close to one million people (www.saweb.co.za). Moller (2008:16) indicates that the unemployment rate in Mamelodi is 63.6 per cent. So it was a fitting experience for the learners, who had never ventured into business before, to make substantial profit that will be paid to learners as dividends. “Its great to see the learners realise what they are able to achieve through the programme and especially when they are sharing the dividends at the end of the programme.” Says facilitator on the programme, Power Masemola.

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Keynote speaker, Preston Sihlangu hands out certificates to learners

This is exactly why the now-resident of Pretoria, Preston Sihlangu musician and owner of a production company called Red Capet Music used the opportunity as keynote speaker at the certification ceremony to inspire the graduates of the programme; “Now that you have the business acumen necessary to make wise decisions, invest in your business and make mature decisions. The country needs a different kind of role model than what is currently available to the youth!” he went on to say to the 150-strong audience that gathered in celebration of this milestone.

“There is so much unemployment in Mamelodi and we need inspiration to continue to find alternative income. The JA South Africa programme is much needed and appreciated in Mamelodi” Godfrey Tswai, graduate of the programme was quoted as saying.

 This programme was launched in 2012 and by end of 2015 JA South Africa will have run 65 such programmes that will reach an impressive total of 1534 out of school youth now having the skills to begin their own businesses and have the potential to become possibility seekers and creators of opportunities.

Other speakers on the day included representatives from University of Pretoria’s Mamelodi campus, NYDA and SEDA. Siya Mapoko, author of the book; The Best Advise I Ever Got generously donated a book to each of the learners. Together with a USB containing brochures and contact details of entrepreneurship incubator programmes, we are confident these learners will be successful in their future ventures.

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The Ginger Beer Challenge

What do you get when you combine a team of young potential entrepreneurs and the ingredients to make 20 litres of ginger beer? The introduction to the JA out of school youth enterprise development programme of course!

JA South Africa is always looking for ways to stimulate and motivate young people to launch their own small businesses and this is precisely why the ginger beer challenge is now included in the introductory session of the programme. In an effort to encourage programme participants to think entrepreneurially right from the beginning of the programme, students are divided into groups of five and are provided with the ingredients and a recipe to make 20L of ginger beer. Their challenge is to generate as much profit as possible through the sale of the ginger beer. Decisions as to who will make the ginger beer, where they will sell it, how to market it and the price are left completely up to the individual teams.

Ginger Beer

The Nalt company from the Ekurhuleni Business Centre programme funded by GE South Africa found their ginger beer to be so popular that they decided to continue with this business for the rest of the programme. After generating a net profit of R200 during the challenge, the group realised that there was a huge demand for their product as the traditional ginger beer made in African cultures is not available in retail stores. The team identified corporate office parks and taxi ranks as ideal points of sale and have doubled their profits. In an effort to ensure that their product is unique, the company is currently researching and testing individual family recipes for ginger beer to create their own unique, secret recipe.

The companies formed during a similar programme, called ITS TYME, at the Khaya Centre in Lehae, funded by Absa, all decided to continue selling their ginger beer. To ensure their competitive advantage, some teams have included products that complement the ginger beear flavour such as hot dogs, boerewors rolls and the like.

“This challenge is fantastic because it demands that the students pull together quickly. They only have a week in which to sell their ginger beer and the teamwork they need to display to complete the task is essential for the success of any potential entrepreneur” noted Joanne Bender, National Programmes Manager at JA South Africa.

Young Entrepreneurs Show Promise

The Youth Enterprise Development (YED) Programme, funded by the DG Murray Trust, and the ITS TYME Programme, funded by Absa, were launched by Junior Achievement South Africa last year, to try to alleviate the high rate of youth unemployment in South Africa.   Both programmes focus on  teaching unemployed youth between the ages of 18 and 35 how to start and run their own sustainable businesses. 

Since the start of the YED Programme midway through 2012, JASA has carefully monitored and mentored the small business owners that have completed the programme. During the mentorship phase, JASA has seen some astounding outcomes of the programme, through the successful, sustainable businesses that have flourished in the past six months. We have decided to feature two of the many successful businesses that have resulted from the out of school programmes. 

Nolubabalo Madudela, 33

Nolubabalo was already a business owner when she began the Youth Enterprise Development Programme, funded by the DG Murray Trust, at the NYDA office in Cape Town in August 2012.  She started selling fish and chips from her house in 2007 when she couldn’t find a job, but joined the programme because she wanted to learn how to grow her business into a sustainable, functional enterprise. 

During the programme she realised that she needed to  include additional products to ensure that she had enough of a selection to grow her target market and decided to add fat cakes to her menu, which increased the demand for her products.  Nolubabalo had one stall when she started the programme, but the demand for her products has grown so much in the past six months, that she has added a second stall at a busy location.  Nolubabalo’s business NS Mini Tuckshop also employs three people; two to assist with the preparation of the food and an additional lady to run the new stall.  Nolubabalo notes that she has experienced some challenges but that her ability to adapt and learn has helped her create a successful, sustainable business.

Sarah Dube, 33

Sarah Dube started her small health food business, called Go Vegan, during the Youth Enterprise Development Programme, funded by the DG Murray Trust, at the NYDA office in Cape Town in August 2012. She had previously tried her hand at selling whole-wheat fat cakes but did not have the know how to further develop her business.  During the programme, Go Vegan began by selling pies and samoosas, on foot, in areas with heavy foot traffic. 

Sarah’s business has grown dramatically in the past six months and she has added a variety of muffins, cakes, sesame bars and health cakes to her menu.  Go Vegan not only has a strong individual customer base but Sarah is now supplying a bed and breakfast establishment, a hair salon and three colleges with baked goods. Sarah is pleased with her progress thus far and she has big dreams for Go Vegan.  Sarah currently has no transport and she has to carry her stock as she delivers to her customers.  Her next goal is to open her own shop and employ someone to help her bake and prepare her orders for the next day.